Frederick Seitz standing near a simulated apparatus

When the bombing of Berlin became very severe, [Werner] Heisenberg moved the equipment with which he hoped to achieve a nuclear chain reaction to an abandoned wine-storage cavern in the town of Haigerloch near Tubingen. The site is now a museum containing simulated apparatus. [Frederick Seitz] was taken there by the university physicists and asked to give a brief talk to them and reporters, emphasizing the differences in the U.S. and German approaches to the problem and why U.S. succeeded. One of the many enigmatic facets to the German approach is the fact that two independent groups (military and civilian) accumulated equipment for potential reactors. Had they pooled resources and cooperated, they might have succeeded. Nuclear reactors, Credit Line: Foto by: Gerhard Groebe, courtesy of AIP Emilio Segrè Visual Archives, Seitz Collection
Abstract/Description: When the bombing of Berlin became very severe, [Werner] Heisenberg moved the equipment with which he hoped to achieve a nuclear chain reaction to an abandoned wine-storage cavern in the town of Haigerloch near Tubingen. The site is now a museum containing simulated apparatus. [Frederick Seitz] was taken there by the university physicists and asked to give a brief talk to them and reporters, emphasizing the differences in the U.S. and German approaches to the problem and why U.S. succeeded. One of the many enigmatic facets to the German approach is the fact that two independent groups (military and civilian) accumulated equipment for potential reactors. Had they pooled resources and cooperated, they might have succeeded. Nuclear reactors
Subject(s): Institution building
Nuclear physics--Research
World War II
Eyeglasses
Uranium oxides
Equipment and supplies
Seitz, Frederick, 1911-2008
Credit Line: Foto by: Gerhard Groebe, courtesy of AIP Emilio Segrè Visual Archives, Seitz Collection
Catalog ID: Seitz Frederick F1