William Shockley, Walter H. Brattain and John Bardeen discussing the crystal structure of semi-conductive materials

(L-R): William Shockley, Walter H. Brattain and John Bardeen discussing the crystal structure of semi-conductive materials. These Bell Laboratories scientists whose work resulted in the transistor's invention. It was through such purely theoretical studies and extensive laboratory investigations that the physical principle on which the transistor functions was discovered and explained. In 1948 the transistor produced amplification as high as 100 to 1 (20 decibels). Some test models were operated as amplifiers at frequencies up to 10 MHz. In 1956 there were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for their work, a prime example of benefits from Bell Laboratories' mission-oriented basic research., Credit Line: Bell Laboratories / Alcatel-Lucent USA Inc., courtesy of AIP Emilio Segrè Visual Archives, Physics Today Collection
Abstract/Description: (L-R): William Shockley, Walter H. Brattain and John Bardeen discussing the crystal structure of semi-conductive materials. These Bell Laboratories scientists whose work resulted in the transistor's invention. It was through such purely theoretical studies and extensive laboratory investigations that the physical principle on which the transistor functions was discovered and explained. In 1948 the transistor produced amplification as high as 100 to 1 (20 decibels). Some test models were operated as amplifiers at frequencies up to 10 MHz. In 1956 there were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for their work, a prime example of benefits from Bell Laboratories' mission-oriented basic research.
Subject(s): Suits (Clothing)
Blackboards
Conversation
Portraits, Group
Bardeen, John
Brattain, Walter H. (Walter Houser), 1902-1987
Shockley, William, 1910-1989
Date Created: circa 1948
Credit Line: Bell Laboratories / Alcatel-Lucent USA Inc., courtesy of AIP Emilio Segrè Visual Archives, Physics Today Collection
Catalog ID: Shockley William C4