Accelerating chamber of the 37-inch cyclotron, as it was beginning in 1937, at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory

Accelerating chamber of the 37-inch cyclotron, as it was beginning in 1937, at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory (currently known as the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). This represented a further advance in sophistication of cyclotron technology, as well as in beam energy and intensity. This chamber was built to go between pole tips of the 85-ton magnet. An improved target chamber is seen with its toggle mechanism for moving the vacuum gate. The most important single technical advance, besides increase in size, was the introduction of rubber gaskets and the elimination of wax - to maintain a vacuum.  In September, 1938, the energy was 8 MeV for deuterons, with a steady current of 80 microamperes.  Radio-phosphorus produced in this cyclotron then had been used in therapy for 9 months, and by the end of the month experimental treatment of cancer with neutrons was started.  On July 1, 1938 the machine went into 24-hour, 7 day-a-week operation to accommodate mounting research needs., Credit Line: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, courtesy of AIP Emilio Segrè Visual Archives, Physics Today Collection
Abstract/Description: Accelerating chamber of the 37-inch cyclotron, as it was beginning in 1937, at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory (currently known as the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). This represented a further advance in sophistication of cyclotron technology, as well as in beam energy and intensity. This chamber was built to go between pole tips of the 85-ton magnet. An improved target chamber is seen with its toggle mechanism for moving the vacuum gate. The most important single technical advance, besides increase in size, was the introduction of rubber gaskets and the elimination of wax - to maintain a vacuum. In September, 1938, the energy was 8 MeV for deuterons, with a steady current of 80 microamperes. Radio-phosphorus produced in this cyclotron then had been used in therapy for 9 months, and by the end of the month experimental treatment of cancer with neutrons was started. On July 1, 1938 the machine went into 24-hour, 7 day-a-week operation to accommodate mounting research needs.
Subject(s): Particle accelerators
Cyclotrons
Equipment and supplies
Berkeley (Calif.)
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Credit Line: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, courtesy of AIP Emilio Segrè Visual Archives, Physics Today Collection
Catalog ID: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory F1