Morton Panish sitting next to a Molecular Beam Epitaxy machine

Morton Panish sitting next to a Molecular Beam Epitaxy machine. The new bipolar transistor invented at Murray Hill was the fastest of its kind in the world as of 12/19/1988. Morton Panish invented the epitaxial method used to create the transistor. Bipolar transistors widely used in in communications systems and the workhorses of ultra high speed computers are typically made of silicon and can operate at frequencies up to 12 gigahertz, billion operations per second. The new Bell Labs transistors, invented by Young Kai Chen, A.F.J. Levi, Richard Nottenburg and Morton Panish, are made of indium phosphide and gallium indium arsenide. They operate at 140 gigahertz. The researchers used a method called gas source molecular beam epitaxy GSNBE., Credit Line: Bell Laboratories / Alcatel-Lucent USA Inc. / Collins Radio Company, courtesy of AIP Emilio Segrè Visual Archives, Hecht Collection
Abstract/Description: Morton Panish sitting next to a Molecular Beam Epitaxy machine. The new bipolar transistor invented at Murray Hill was the fastest of its kind in the world as of 12/19/1988. Morton Panish invented the epitaxial method used to create the transistor. Bipolar transistors widely used in in communications systems and the workhorses of ultra high speed computers are typically made of silicon and can operate at frequencies up to 12 gigahertz, billion operations per second. The new Bell Labs transistors, invented by Young Kai Chen, A.F.J. Levi, Richard Nottenburg and Morton Panish, are made of indium phosphide and gallium indium arsenide. They operate at 140 gigahertz. The researchers used a method called gas source molecular beam epitaxy GSNBE.
Subject(s): Equipment and supplies
Panish, Morton B.
Date Created: December 19, 1988
Credit Line: Bell Laboratories / Alcatel-Lucent USA Inc. / Collins Radio Company, courtesy of AIP Emilio Segrè Visual Archives, Hecht Collection
Catalog ID: Panish Morton F1