The 27 1/2-inch accelerating chamber, with two 'Dees' in place, used in the first major cyclotron, at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory

The 27 1/2-inch accelerating chamber, with two 'Dees' in place, used in the first major cyclotron, at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory (currently known as the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory).  This chamber was used, between 1932 and 1935, in the 85-ton magnet in the 'Old Radiation Laboratory' of the late Ernest O. Lawrence on the Berkeley campus.  Subsequently, a 37-inch chamber was installed, and the instrument historically has been referred to as the 37-inch cyclotron.  This chamber represented a great improvement over earlier models.  The period when this chamber was in use was one of great advances in cyclotron research and technology. Beam energy and intensity were markedly increased; in less than two years the currents had been increased more than 20,000 times, and energies had been reached sufficient to affect all but the heaviest nuclei.  On December 10, 1935, the cyclotron yielded a maximum current of 20 microamperes of 5 million electron volts.  With this chamber many radioisotopes were discovered, and some were produced for the first tracer experiments., Credit Line: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, courtesy of AIP Emilio Segrè Visual Archives, Fermi Film Collection
Abstract/Description: The 27 1/2-inch accelerating chamber, with two 'Dees' in place, used in the first major cyclotron, at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory (currently known as the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). This chamber was used, between 1932 and 1935, in the 85-ton magnet in the 'Old Radiation Laboratory' of the late Ernest O. Lawrence on the Berkeley campus. Subsequently, a 37-inch chamber was installed, and the instrument historically has been referred to as the 37-inch cyclotron. This chamber represented a great improvement over earlier models. The period when this chamber was in use was one of great advances in cyclotron research and technology. Beam energy and intensity were markedly increased; in less than two years the currents had been increased more than 20,000 times, and energies had been reached sufficient to affect all but the heaviest nuclei. On December 10, 1935, the cyclotron yielded a maximum current of 20 microamperes of 5 million electron volts. With this chamber many radioisotopes were discovered, and some were produced for the first tracer experiments.
Subject(s): Particle accelerators
Cyclotrons
Laboratories
Equipment and supplies
Berkeley (Calif.)
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Credit Line: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, courtesy of AIP Emilio Segrè Visual Archives, Fermi Film Collection
Catalog ID: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory F3