Bottomley with MRI Scan

'WORLD'S FIRST. With the help of magnetic fields 30,000 times as strong as the earth's, a General Electric scientist has for the first time been able to perform chemical analysis of a living human heart by non-invasive means. This first was achieved by Dr. Paul A. Bottomley (photo), a physicist at the GE Research and Development Center in Schenectady, N. Y., employing a GE-pioneered technique called depth-resolved magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy. By means of powerful magnetic fields, radio waves, and a computer, it can sample the chemistry of living body tissues without cutting a patient open or inserting any probes. Here, Dr. Bottomley examines MR spectra showing the relative amounts of energy-producing phosphorus compounds in the heart of a normal male volunteer. The fact that the amounts of these chemicals change according to the heart's state of health could provide clues that would enable physicians to evaluate heart disease and monitor its response to therapy. On the screen is an MR image showing the subject's heart and other organs.' August 22, 1985 press release. Magnetic resonance imaging, Credit Line: General Electric Global Research, courtesy AIP Emilio Segrè Visual Archives, Physics Today Collection
Abstract/Description: 'WORLD'S FIRST. With the help of magnetic fields 30,000 times as strong as the earth's, a General Electric scientist has for the first time been able to perform chemical analysis of a living human heart by non-invasive means. This first was achieved by Dr. Paul A. Bottomley (photo), a physicist at the GE Research and Development Center in Schenectady, N. Y., employing a GE-pioneered technique called depth-resolved magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy. By means of powerful magnetic fields, radio waves, and a computer, it can sample the chemistry of living body tissues without cutting a patient open or inserting any probes. Here, Dr. Bottomley examines MR spectra showing the relative amounts of energy-producing phosphorus compounds in the heart of a normal male volunteer. The fact that the amounts of these chemicals change according to the heart's state of health could provide clues that would enable physicians to evaluate heart disease and monitor its response to therapy. On the screen is an MR image showing the subject's heart and other organs.' August 22, 1985 press release. Magnetic resonance imaging
Subject(s): Profile portraits
Equipment and supplies
Charts
Experiment--physics
Magnets
Spectrographs
Portraits
Schenectady (N.Y.)
Bottomley, Paul A.
Date Created: 1985
Credit Line: General Electric Global Research, courtesy AIP Emilio Segrè Visual Archives, Physics Today Collection
Catalog ID: Bottomley Paul B1